If your relative or loved one was a passenger on Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 or Lion Air Flight 610, and you would like to understand your legal rights, we would welcome the opportunity to speak with you. Contact us at 206-623-1900 or via email at

Kama jamaa au mpendwa wako alikuwa abiria kwenye Ndege ya Ethiopian Airlines 302 au Lion Air Flight 610, na ungependa kuelewa haki zako za kisheria, tungependelea kupewa fursa ya kuzungumza nawe. Wasiliana nasi katika +1-206-623-1900 au kupitia barua pepe kwa

ዘመድዎ ወይም ወዳጃችሁ በኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ አውሮፕላን በረራ 302 ወይም Lion Air Flight 610 ተሳፋሪ ከነበሩ፣ እና የህጋዊ መብቶችዎን ለመረዳት ከፈለጉ ከእርስዎ ጋር ለመነጋገር እድሉን እንቀበላለን። በ +1-206-623-1900 ወይም በኢሜል

Jika kerabat atau orang terkasih Anda adalah penumpang di Ethiopian Airlines Penerbangan 302 atau Lion Air Penerbangan 610, dan Anda ingin mengetahui tentang hak-hak hukum Anda, kami akan menyambut baik kesempatan untuk dapat berbicara dengan Anda. Hubungi kami di +1-206-623-1900 atau melalui e-mail di

What Caused the Boeing 737 Max 8 Planes to Crash?

 

Keller Rohrback L.L.P., a U.S. law firm with offices in five states and part of a worldwide network of attorneys, is investigating why two 737 Max 8 planes recently crashed.

A flight-control system on Boeing’s 737 Max 8 aircraft is at the center of the multiple investigations into two plane crashes that took the lives of 157 people in Ethiopia and 189 people in Indonesia.

The deadly crashes—less than five months apart— resulted in grounding of the 737 Max jets around the world. On March 13, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) grounded the planes in the U.S.

According to NPR, the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 (March 10, 2019) and Lion Air Flight 610 in Indonesia (October 29, 2018) shared several similarities including “an anti-stall system on both jets, designed to push the nose of the plane down if flight control systems sense a problem with low air speed. Both the planes appeared to ascend and descend erratically, suggesting the pilots struggled to maintain control.” The flight system is known as MCAS, which stands for Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System.

Several FAA technical experts told The Seattle Times that they were prodded to accelerate the process to certify the Max 8 because Boeing wanted to catch up with rival Airbus. Boeing has increasingly taken over more of the work of certifying the safety of its own planes. The safety analysis report of the MCAS had several crucial flaws, according to The Seattle Times.

The New York Times reports that the cockpits of both flights were also missing two key safety features—the angle of attack indication and disagree light—because Boeing charged extra for them. Neither feature is required by the FAA. Plane manufacturers often charge extra for add-on features—some cosmetic, others involving communication or navigation systems that are needed for the plane’s operations.

Extras have become “a great profit center” for Boeing, said former engineering test pilot Mark H. Goodrich to The New York Times.

Did Boeing or others fail in their duties to protect airline passengers?

If your relative or loved one was a passenger on Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 or Lion Air Flight 610, and you would like to understand your legal rights, we would welcome the opportunity to speak with you.

Please contact us at or 206-623-1900 to discuss your concerns.

About Keller Rohrback L.L.P.

With offices in Seattle, Phoenix, New York, Oakland, Santa Barbara, and Missoula, Keller Rohrback serves as lead and co-lead counsel in class actions throughout the country.

Attorney Advertising. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Not licensed to practice law in all states. Please refer to www.krcomplexlit.com for details.

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